What happens if you mix a square-headed scandinavian, trombone, jazz, soul and New York?

Elektrojazz New York Tribute – a album as an app featuring NYC artists

The best answer to the question in the headline, is to watch this video about four Scandinavians quest to capture the sound and feel of NYC. One of them is a trombone guy (me).

And the four of us together make up Elektrojazz. If you are a long-time digitaltrombone reader, you might remember me bragging about our first album ‘Cars’ – an album dedicated to classic cars. But this time, it is all about New York. Continue reading

    List Of All Time Top 7 Trombone Positions

    After years of playing, I have finally achieved insight enough to make a Top 7 List of my favourite trombone positions. I put my heart and soul into the selection process, and I am very happy with the result. If you disagree, please let me know in the comment section.

    1. First position
    2. Second position
    3. Third position
    4. Fourth position
    5. Fifth position
    6. Seventh position
    7. Sixth position

    Slide on!

      Hands-on jazz exercise: Basic patterns with free sheet music and audio

      This is a free trombone lesson about improvising over basic tonic chords in all keys. It features downloadable sheet music and audio files.

      I am in the making of a new trombone book with patterns for jazz improvising. Since I insist of doing it thoroughly, it is taking me forever, so I decided that it is about time to share some of the content. And the best way to not get paid, is giving it away for free, so that is what I do.

      Playing simple “inside” phrases

      I have heard too many jazz students (and pros) play advanced upper structure phrases, turning complicated scales inside out and moving complex patterns around. Being able to do so is great, but there is one big BUT involved.

      Continue reading

        Trombone lesson: Commute by car and buzz – 10 tips

        10 Tips For What To Buzz While Driving

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        Do you have a car? Do you drive? Do you play trombone? Do you have a spare mouthpiece?

        If you can answer YES to these relevant and life changing questions, please continue reading. If not, go practice or buy a car.

        Since I am a proud trombone, spare mouthpiece and car owner, I have, as many wise trombone players before me, placed a mouthpiece in my car. As you probably figured out already, mouthpiece in car enable you to practise while driving. I give you my 10 best tips for what to practise while driving, but first a few words about road safety: Continue reading

          Can you buzz? This is why you should! And how to.

          I was wrong about how to lip buzz for many years. Now I believe I figured out how to approach it. This is really helping my playing, hope it will help yours too! I recommend that you spend the first nine minutes of your trombone practicing on this.

          Ingredients:
          – 2 lips
          – 1 or 2 lungs
          – 1 trombone mouthpiece
          – one arm with hand attached (or a mouthpiece stand)
          – 9 minutes of precious time

          trombone buzz ingredients

          Combining lip and mouthpiece buzzing

          Lately, I have been experimenting with a combination of lip buzzing and mouthpiece buzzing. It has proven to be a great way to build up embouchure, as well as kick starting the lips. Using the lips attached to my specific body, I have found that lip buzzing somewhat equals mouthpiece buzzing one octave higher. In other words, a phrase played on the mouthpiece should be buzzed one octave lower on the lips to be comparable.

          Buzz right or go to bed

          Years ago, I occasionally did some lip buzzing trying to expand my high range. I once did this before a gig in the same dressing room as a really (as in really) good trumpet player, and he noted that I was able to lip buzz much higher than him. Since he has a world class embouchure, and plays effortlessly in any range, it got me thinking. I had seen him do some lip buzzing, and noticed that his buzzing sound was much richer and mellower than mine. This got me thinking, and I realised that I was actually lip buzzing all wrong! Continue reading

            Trombone lesson: flexibility with staccato and doodle tongue

            Brass instruments in general put high demand on their puppeteers in order to sound good (damn you, piano players and guitar players). I think of it as being a soccer player; you can do your tricks and move the ball around anytime, but in order to be 100% and have the strength to play a whole game, you need a lot of practice. Every day…

            There are a few fundamentals in trombone playing that need constant attention. You need to be aware of yur sound, air flow, embouchure, flexibility, attack, slurring, legato playing…as well as making music, a purpose the trombone is more suited for than most other musical instruments! Therefor, here are a few tips to combine some fundamentals, making your practice session more fun (right…).

            Flexibility-For-TromboneBy combining slurring with staccato and doodle tonguing, you make sure to give the embouchure a healthy workout. Here are a few samples of how you can modify a flexibility exercise by including staccato playing and doodle tonguing. These specific samples are developed from a part of chapter 7 in the book Flexibility For Trombone; Flexibility With Rhythm. With a little bit of creativity, you could give most trombone flexibility exercises the same treatment. Continue reading

              Two simple but highly effective breathing exercises for brass players

              As I have written before, brass playing is not about using a lot of power and forcing your lips to vibrate by compressing as much air through your system as possible. It is all about finding the most relaxed way to move a lot of air through your instrument, while keeping your (correct) embouchure in place. These simple exercises should point you in that direction.

              The breathing exercises

              The two breathing exercises described in the video below are great for brass players. They will help you open up your throat for free air flow, as well as relax your upper body for a more optimal breathing.

              The first one described in the video is the Breath Of Fire (go find your inner dragon), and it is a great way to kick start your breathing before playing.

              The Root Lock is a tremendeous way to release tensions in your abdominal region. It might make you feel a bit light headed since you force some extra oxygen to your brain, so don´t overdo it. Deep sighs have a similar effect, but I don´t find it quite as effective as the root lock. A good fast fix though.

              Continue reading

                Premiere: new series of books with solos over famous jazz standards – Jazzld.com

                Do you like to play jazz solos, but need new inspiration? Or are you not yet a skilled improviser, but want to get started with jazz soloing right away? Then I hope I have come up with the solution for you:

                After month of work, I can finally present my new venture, Jazzld.com where you will find jazz books with written solos based on famous jazz standards. There are currently three books available; Jazz’ld Vol. 1, Jazz’ld Vol. 2 and (surprise!) Jazz’ld Vol. 3. Each book is written to match a selected Aebersold play-along recording, so if you have access to one of those already, you will get even more out of the books.

                Jazz'ld vol. 1-3

                Based on famous jazz standards

                The Jazz’ld Jazz Solos books will let you play great jazz solos over the chord progressions from famous jazz standards. You don’t need any improvising experience to get started.

                The books consist of jazz solos, written over the chord progressions from famous jazz standards. You will find solos based on the chord progressions from “Summertime,” “Watermelon Man,” “Autumn Leaves,” “Have You Met Miss Jones,” “My Favourite Things,” “Scrapple from the Apple” and many other well-known jazz standards. Each solo consists of several choruses, gradually getting more and more challenging. See the full list of featured jazz standards here.

                The books are made to be playable on virtually any instrument, but being a bone player myself, I can assure that they are an excellent match for trombone.

                Who are you?

                I had a number of different categories of musicians in mind when writing the books. Does any of these descriptions fit on you?

                • Trombone student entering the world of jazz
                • Advanced jazz trombone player
                • Amateur musician
                • Trombone educator
                • Professional jazz player
                • Classical trombone player

                Jazz’ld with Aebersold play-along albums

                Have you ever practiced using Jamey Aebersold play-along albums? Although they can’t give you the same experience as when you interact with musicians in person, the Aebersold tracks are still a great tool for learning and practicing jazz standards.

                The Jazz’ld books are written as a complement to carefully selected Aebersold albums. If you have one of them already, the Jazz’ld solos will let you rediscover it in a new and fun way. Each Jazz’ld solo will match the form, key and tempo of the equivalent Aebersold play-along track.

                The books

                Jazz’ld Solos Vol. 1 is perfect for aspiring jazz players with solos based on Canataloupe Island and other easy tunes. SUITABLE FOR JAMEY AEBERSOLD VOL. 54 – MAIDEN VOYAGE  (NOT INCLUDED)

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                Jazz’ld Solos Vol. 2 is based on a selection of timeless classics, including Have You Met Miss Jones and My Foolish HeartSUITABLE FOR JAMEY AEBERSOLD VOL. 25 – ALL TIME STANDARDS (NOT INCLUDED)

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                Jazz’ld Solos Vol. 3
                lets you play bebop solos over the chords from Charlie Parker tunes like Donna Lee and Yardbird Suite right away. SUITABLE FOR JAMEY AEBERSOLD VOL. 6 – CHARLIE PARKER (NOT INCLUDED)

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                Transcribed jazz solos

                One of the best ways to learn jazz is to play transcribed solos. Transcribing solos yourself is great ear training, but it is a time consuming task. If you want to get started right away, the Jazz’ld series will let you start playing high-quality jazz solos right away.

                Playing transcribed jazz solos as played by jazz masters are often technically challenging. Jazz’ll gives you get the same experience, but you are able to choose the level of difficulty since each jazz etude gets more challenging for each chorus.

                I use the solos for my students on many different levels, as well as play them myself as etudes. Great for sight reading and building up chops!

                I hope you like the concept and the books. There is a free sample from the books waiting for you at Jazzld.com

                Play on!

                Anders Larson
                founder of digitaltrombone.com and (finally) jazzld.com

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                  Trombone lesson: warm up and play music (sort of) at the same time

                  Playing scale patterns in all keys as a trombone warm up will make you think while playing. Why not improve your chops and get smarter at the same time? (I will cover how to get prettier in a future post…)

                  You could put your trombone out in the sun for a quick warm up, but I still recommend the old fashioned way that includes actually playing on it. To get your lips soft and responsive, you should start by planing soft in a comfortable range, slowly expanding the range in both directions.

                  Playing long notes, slow etudes and simple flexibility exercises is are fine ways to warm up. But in this lesson I want to focus on combining trombone warm up with getting to know your instrument better and heat up your brain at the same time.

                  Trombones are not as visually laid out as a piano or a guitar. It is hard to visualise notes, and it takes a lifetime to really get under the skin of the bastard. Continue reading

                    I don´t agree with Christian Lindberg on this one

                    A modest reply to Christian Lindberg´s statement about why not to buzz.

                    I stumbled over this short video with Christian Lindberg talking about why you should not buzz. Christian, I truly respect you as one of the worlds very finest trombone players ever, but I have to disagree with you on this one.


                    Continue reading